skip to content

Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme

 

A variety of cutting-edge research projects are currently being conducted by researchers affiliated with the Cambridge Interfaith Programme and the Faculty of Divinity.

 

CIP Religion and Global Challenges Initiative

The CIP Religion and Global Challenges Initiative seeks to generate tangible and sustainable solutions to worldwide problems by deepening understanding of the role that religious communities play – and could play – in exacerbating or in alleviating such problems. It will bring together theologians, social and natural scientists and religious communities to think through the most pressing global challenges facing us today.

 

The Scripture & Violence Project

The Scripture & Violence Project is a research and impact project focused on illuminating the complex relationship between scriptural texts and real-world acts of violence, challenging assumptions that are commonly held in the public sphere.

 

Shared Sacred 

The Shared Sacred project focuses on the spatial and temporal modes of proximity between persons and communities of ‘different’ faith. It will be inaugurated in 2021 through four main activities: a) an experimental panel on inter-faith photography for wide audiences; b) an exhibition of anthropological photography; c) an academic symposium, and d) a drawing competition for Cambridgeshire's schoolchildren. 

 

Holocaust Memory and Muslims in Germany

This is the first ever major study to analyse and propose ways of improving Holocaust education programs designed for Muslims.

 

Making British Islam Across Generations

How do different generations of Muslims understand what it means to be a Muslim in the UK? This is a collaboration between University of Cambridge Divinity Faculty and the Everyday Muslim Heritage and Archive Initiative.

 

The Politics of Afterlives: Martyrdom and the Making of a Transnational Kurdish Political Community

This project investigates the role that martyrdom plays in the ongoing Kurdish conflict.

 

Being German, Becoming Muslim: Race, Religion, and Conversion

Every year more and more Europeans are embracing Islam, and Islam is also increasingly seen as contrary to European values. This project explores how converts balance their love for Islam with society's fear of it, and how they shape debates about race, religion, and belonging in today’s Europe.

 

Bosnian Sacred Landscapes

This is a long-term investigation of sacred landscapes shared by different Bosnian communities of faith after the 1990s conflict, with special focus on the Dinaric highlands. 

 

Antisemitism, Islamophobia, and Racism

This project explores the complicated relationships between antisemitism, islamophobia, and other kinds of racism and discrimination. 

 

Conversion from Islam to Christianity

This project explores the dynamics and symbolism of Muslim conversions to Christianity in Turkey and in Europe.

 

Islam and Secularism in Turkey

This project explores how Islamic, secular, and nationalist worldviews compete with each other in the political sphere.

 

Scriptural Reasoning in the University

Scriptural Reasoning in the University is an academic collaboration between scholars of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, who use the practice of Scriptural Reasoning as a springboard to knowledge exchange and critical reflection.

Latest news

New CIP videos: Research Seminar in Inter-religious Relations and a Cambridge Festival panel

30 May 2021

Check out the recordings of our recent events, including a Cambridge Festival 2021 panel and three talks for the CIP Research Seminar in Inter-religious Relations. 12...

Professor Esra Özyürek's talk on Holocaust memory for 'This is Germany'

30 May 2021

Professor Esra Özyürek recently spoke for the initiative 'This is Germany' about her research on Holocaust memory and the Muslim minority in Germany. To view the video on...

New Publication: Theologies of Reading (Special Issue of CounterText)

28 April 2021

Theologies of Reading: Positions and Responses , the new issue of CounterText , edited by Laura McCormick Kilbride, Simone Kotva and Ruth Jackson Ravenscroft, has been published.