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NEWS: Divinity Dispatches - Launch of Faculty of Divinity Lockdown Website

last modified May 04, 2020 02:12 PM
A new website has been launched to enable the Faculty of Divinity & CIP to keep in touch with colleagues, friends and students during lockdown

'Divinity Dispatches' - a recently launched website from the Faculty of Divinity and CIP offers online access to content that specifically responds to the COVID 19 pandemic and subsequent lock-down.

Developed to informally support and communicate with our many and varied stakeholders during this period of confinement, Divinity Dispatches features online access to public lectures, research seminars, interviews, updates, and other online resources. It includes an 'interfaith cook book' with recipes contributed by colleagues, which we hope will be added to as we use this time to reflect on ritual, seclusion, food and fasting.

Visit the website here, and follow the Twitter account here.

NEWS: CIP welcomes Professor Esra Özyürek

last modified Apr 17, 2020 03:32 PM
Prof Esra Özyürek has been announced as the new Sultan Qaboos Professor of Abrahamic Faiths & Shared Values & CIP Academic Director

Professor Esra Özyürek has accepted election to the Sultan Qaboos Professorship of Abrahamic Faiths and Shared Values from 1 October 2020.  She is joining the Faculty of Divinity from the London School of Economics, where she is currently Professor in European Anthropology and Chair in Contemporary Turkish Studies. Professor Özyürek will also become Academic Director of the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme.

 

NEWS: Call for papers on 'Responsibility & Scripture' for ASA Conference 2020

last modified Feb 12, 2020 01:01 PM
Invitation to submit a paper abstract for our panel ‘Responsibility and Scripture’ at the forthcoming Conference of the Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and the Commonwealth (ASA), taking place at the University of St Andrews from 24-27 August 2020.

 

Panel title: Responsibility and Scripture

[Panel no. 16 | Stream: ‘Who speaks, and for whom?’]

Convenors: Dr Safet HadziMuhamedovic (Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge), Dr Daniel H. Weiss (Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge), Dr Julia Snyder (Centre for Advanced Studies, University of Regensburg)

The call for papers is now open and closes on 15 March 2020. 

Short abstract:

How can we rethink the relationship between scriptures and violence in terms of responsibility? Can scriptures be responsible in and of themselves? Or are they taken as an alibi for the interpretative act? What sorts of agency can we distinguish in the social lives of scriptures? Who (or what) is answerable and when?

Long abstract:

Scriptures are variously put into practice, to sanction morality, justify everyday actions, politics and momentous changes. Other people’s scriptures can be employed to impute violence to them, even distribute blame to entire communities of faith. So, how can we think responsibility through sacred texts and their political articulations? Who is entrusted with responsibility and when? What are the limits of responsibility? Does divine agency ever absolve human actions? And, if so, can the divine (text) ever be held responsible? Does responsibility lie with the author, the text or the reader? And, are communities of faith responsible for how the scriptures they hold sacred are employed by their members? Should they defend them? How is authority of interpretation re-appropriated and challenged? These are pressing questions in a world continuously shaped by acts in reference to divine authority, a world ripe with friction regarding the dispensation of responsibility for assumed scriptural stipulations. Contributions should contextualise the relation of responsibility and scripture, whether in terms of violence, community and interfaith relations, gender and sexuality, nonhumans, environmental degradation, text and embodiment, historical imagination, contemplations on the future and politics of identity, or otherwise. Inspired by the ‘Scripture and Violence’ project of the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme at the University of Cambridge's Faculty of Divinity, this panel invites anthropological, historical, theological and critical discourse analyses of responsibility as related to scriptures.

For more information on how to submit an abstract, please visit: https://www.theasa.org/conferences/asa2020/cfp.shtml

 

 

 

 

NEWS: CIP welcomes Dr Safet HadziMuhamedovic

last modified Jan 28, 2020 11:22 AM
Dr Safet HadžiMuhamedović has joined the CIP Team as a Research Associate in Inter-Faith Relations
NEWS: CIP welcomes Dr Safet HadziMuhamedovic

Dr HadziMuhamedovic

Dr Safet HadžiMuhamedović is an anthropologist of sacred landscapes, syncretism and inter-faith relations. He earned his PhD in Anthropology from Goldsmiths, an MPhil in Social Anthropology from the University of Cambridge and BA degrees in History of Art and Sociology from the University of Sarajevo and Kenyon College. He has conducted long-term ethnographic fieldwork in Bosnia, as well as stints of research in Palestine, Israel and the Basque Country.

Safet joined the CIP team in 2020, after convening anthropological courses on landscapes, religion, gender, kinship, Islam, social theories, politics, economics and research methods at SOAS University of London, the University of Bristol, Goethe University Frankfurt and Goldsmiths University of London. He continues to co-convene the Anthropology of Travel, Tourism and Pilgrimage Summer School at SOAS. He has also previously worked on a large-scale ERC project into transitional justice in Bosnia and Spain and co-founded the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research of Visual Culture in Sarajevo. Safet has been recipient of a number of prestigious research awards (including OSF, ERC and FCO). Safet has written on syncretic landscapes, temporality and historicity, war crime archives, political agency of ‘nonhuman’ beings and ontological approaches to the question of home. His current major project investigates syncretic cosmologies and subterranean rivers in south Bosnia. Safet is the author of Waiting for Elijah: Time and Encounter in a Bosnian Landscape (2018) and the co-editor (with Marija Grujić) of Post-Home: Dwelling on Loss, Belonging and Movement (2019).

 

 

RESEARCH: CIP Research Seminar, 7 February 2020 - Prof Wendy Pullan

last modified Jan 22, 2020 02:50 PM
Research Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations - Prof Wendy Pullan 'Identity Museums: The Secular-Sacred Institutionalisation of Conflict Memories' Friday, 7 February 2020 1.30-3.30pm in the Lightfoot Room

You are warmly invited to attend an Inter-Religious Relations Research Seminar (preceded by a sandwich lunch in the Selwyn Room at 1pm).

Prof Wendy Pullan has sent the following summary of her talk, which will be responded to by Dr Craig Larkin (King's College London):

It is common for ethno-national and religious conflicts to be commemorated in museums. They may be conceived as part of a post-conflict and/or reconstruction effort to mark past struggles in ways that are material and didactic. In some cases, the museums are designed to present both/all sides of the conflict, but more commonly, they are established by factional groups or partisan governments as a way to justify their own cause by memorialising the suffering of their own people. This seminar will examine these issues through several different museums of national and religious struggle including those in Northern Ireland, Cyprus, Lebanon, Israel and Palestine.

Colleagues, undergraduate, MPhil and PhD students from within and outside the Faculty of Divinity are welcome.

RESEARCH: CIP Research Seminar, 24 January 2020 - Dr Simone Kotva

last modified Jan 20, 2020 11:17 AM
Research Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations - Dr Simone Kotva 'An Enquiry Concerning Non-Human Understanding: Crossing Species by Crossing Disciplines' with Rev Dr Tim Jenkins as Respondent Friday, 24 January 2020 1.30-3.30pm in the Lightfoot Room

You are warmly invited to attend an Inter-Religious Relations Research Seminar (preceded by a sandwich lunch in the Selwyn Room at 1pm).

Dr Simone Kotva has sent the following summary of her talk, which will be responded to by Rev Dr Tim Jenkins:

The 'non-human' eludes our grasp. To speak of it is to invoke all the spirits, ghosts, gods, monsters and other immeasurable, inconceivable agencies that have shaped human ways of earth-living. Theology may have plenty of stories about the non-human, plenty of ways of talking about gods and the nature of gods, but how often does talking about the non-human and writing about the nature of non-humanity becoming thinking non-humanly? How does the story ofthe non-human actually help (if at all) to get results environmentally, ethically and politically? This seminar will explore 'god-talk' as insurgent discourse that crosses species by crossing disciplines, faiths, and practices.

Colleagues, undergraduate, MPhil and PhD students from within and outside the Faculty of Divinity are welcome.

RESEARCH: CIP Research Seminar, 17 January 2020 - Dr Jessica Frazier

last modified Jan 13, 2020 02:13 PM
Research Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations - Dr Jessica Frazier 'Doing Religious Studies with Gadamer: A Journey from Cultural Language, to Spiritual Bildung to Global Destiny' Friday, 17 January 2020 1.30-3.30pm in the Lightfoot Room

You are warmly invited to attend the first seminar of the Inter-Religious Relations Research Seminar Series held during Lent Term 2020. The seminar will be preceded by a sandwich lunch in the Selwyn Room at 1pm.

Dr Jessica Frazier has sent the following summary of her talk:

Hans-Georg Gadamer was a secular man who rarely mentioned religion – yet he worked with religious and/or spiritual traditions for most of his life, and was the author of a theory that placed inter-cultural understanding at the heart of human flourishing and fulfilment. In this seminar we will explore the way his account of inter-cultural understanding stands within broader Bildung-based philosophies of spiritual growth and communal health. We see how his readings of Greek thought took it as a religious worldview, how this was echoed in his treatment of poetic discourse and the arts, and how this informed his late expansion of hermeneutics into philosophies of self, education, art, health, and globalism. In all, we see how a Gadamerian reading of Religious Studies casts it as the creative ‘art’ of understanding, and the process by which the raw material of culture itself comes into being throughout history.

Colleagues, undergraduate, MPhil and PhD students from within and outside the Faculty of Divinity are welcome.

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Dr Elizabeth Fowden

last modified Oct 30, 2019 11:34 AM
Research Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations - Dr Elizabeth Fowden 'From Deucalion's Flood to Abrahamic Rain-Prayers: Approaches to Sacred Space in Athens Friday, 8 November 2019 1.30-3.30pm in the Lightfoot Room
RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Dr Elizabeth Fowden

Le Temple de Jupiter Olympien et l'Acropolis d'Athenes showing the open air mosque in 1819, Louis Dupre 1825. Credit: American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Gennadius Library

Dr Fowden uses the complex pagan, Christian, Muslim and contemporary history of the Olympieion precinct to examine ideological conflicts and contradictory genealogies that co-exist in what the Cambridge urban historian Wendy Pullan calls a 'transitional topography'.

The respondent is Dr Maximilian Sternberg, Department of Architecture.

All colleagues, undergraduate, MPhil and PhD students in the Divinity Faculty or other areas (such as Classics, History, Modern and Medieval Languages, English, Philosophy and FAMES) are warmly welcome to attend this seminar.

Tea will be served at 3.30pm in the Selwyn Room.

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Marietta van der Tol

last modified Oct 30, 2019 11:22 AM
Research Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations - Marietta van der Tol 'The Christian Nation in Protestant Thought: Old Wine in New Bottles?' Friday, 25 October 2019 12.30-2pm in the Lightfoot Room
RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Marietta van der Tol

Ambrogio Lorenzetti 'Allegory of the Good Government' (detail)

This seminar will discuss the kinship between the corpus Christianum and the Christian nation state, compare critical reflections to either from withing continental traditions of Protestant political thought, and reflect on its implications for responses to right-wing populism today.

The respondent is Dr Muthuraj Swamy (Director, Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide, Westminster College).

All colleagues, undergraduate, MPhil and PhD students in the Divinity Faculty or other areas (such as Classics, History, Modern & Medieval Languages, English, Philosophy and FAMES) are warmly welcome to attend this seminar.

NEWS: 'Scripture & Violence' Nominated for Research Impact Award

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:07 AM
Dr Daniel Weiss & Dr Julia Snyder's research project challenging assumptions about religious texts and acts of violence is recognised at Vice-Chancellor's Research & Impact Engagement Awards 2019
NEWS: 'Scripture & Violence' Nominated for Research Impact Award

Dr Giles Waller, Dr Daniel Weiss & Dr Julia Snyder

Representatives of CIP attended an awards ceremony recognising excellence in research, impact and engagement, hosted by the University of Cambridge's Vice Chancellor. 

'Scripture & Violence' is a two-year collaborative research project focusing on challenging prevalent contemporary assumptions about the relationship between scriptural texts and real-world violence, in relation to Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions. Questioning whether, for example, the Qur’an actually does play a major role in inspiring Muslim terrorism. Following two international conferences, 'Scripture & Violence' will culminate in an edited volume with Routledge (to be published in 2020), that is intended to be both academically rigorous and accessible to a non-academic readership.

The project was planned from the start with collaboration in mind – both in terms of the research itself and in relation to impact.  The two main academic collaborators (Dr Daniel Weiss and Dr Julia Snyder) came to the project from different countries, different academic fields, different institutions, and different religious backgrounds.  Other researchers who took part in the project came from Pakistan, Israel, and the US - all nations where religion plays a greater role in public discourse.  

As well as academic researchers, the conferences were attended by representatives of non-academic stakeholder organisations - such as Saleem Seedat (imam at Blackburn College and a member of the Scotland Yard Counter-Terrorism Advisory Board), and Nadiya Takolia (who coordinates public interfaith dialogue sessions involving scriptural texts for the Rose Castle Foundation).   

Partner organisations (Rose Castle Foundation, Coexist House and Faith in Leadership) developed workshops for UK faith leaders and other interested individuals, using the research as a platform for discussing how participants could facilitate discussion of these issues in their own local contexts.  These sessions fed back into the final versions of the research essays in the edited volume, tailoring the writing to appeal to as wide an audience as possible.

The research was also the theme for well-attended and highly praised public events at the LSE Faith Centre and Greenbelt Festival.

 

 

 

 

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Dr Ankur Barua

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:18 AM
A seminar entitled ‘Hindu Visions of Divinity: Doctrinal Vignettes for Christians – Prolegomena to a Monograph’ – Dr Ankur Barua (Lecturer in Hindu Studies, Faculty of Divinity) on 11 October 2019

Friday, 11 October 2019: 1.30 – 3.30pm in the Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity 

‘Hindu Visions of Divinity: Doctrinal Vignettes for Christians – Prolegomena to a Monograph – Dr Ankur Barua (Lecturer in Hindu Studies, Faculty of Divinity) 

Respondent – Dr Ruth Jackson (Sidney Sussex College)

Dr Barua will present 'work-in-progress' for a book he is writing.  He is seeking to systematically explore the validity of some specific translations of Indic terms into English which are offered in lectures to undergraduate students – can brahman, karuṇā, prasāda, and prema be translated as ‘God’, ‘mercy’, ‘grace’, and ‘love’, and if these translations are to be rejected because of their distinctively Christian inflections, examine how might we speak in English at all about Hindu life-worlds?

Second, he will offer the following invitation to those who might be doctrinally more orthodox: "If you wish to draw on your current understanding of Christian theology as a cognitive-experiential bridgehead into Hindu styles of spirituality, you could read these introductory vignettes."

Written from the perspective of a friendly critic, Dr Barua's book is an invitation to Christian theologians to articulate fully incarnationalist visions in which the motif of deep religious diversity is not relegated to parenthetical remarks or passing footnotes or stray appendices but is instituted as a topic that is as vitally integral to doctrinal reflection as the standard loci of creation, atonement and redemption.

 All colleagues, MPhil and PhD students in the Divinity Faculty or other areas (such as Classics, History, Modern and Medieval Languages, English, Philosophy, and FAMES) are warmly welcome to attend this seminar.

 

PUBLIC EVENT: CIP's Festival of Ideas Events 2019

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:08 AM
Two talks hosted by CIP for the Festival of Ideas 2019 on the theme of 'change'
PUBLIC EVENT: CIP's Festival of Ideas Events 2019

Manual Capellari

CHANGING HEARTS & MINDS - 16 OCTOBER 2019, 7.30-9PM

A talk about the range of ways in which conversion has been experienced & narrated in different religious cultures. 

What does it mean to turn oneself - or be turned to - God? How, historically, have individuals imagined, experienced and narrated their own conversion and that of others? Do they conceive of religious conversion as a single moment or a lengthy – even lifelong – process? How have religious communities ratified or sealed conversions? 

These questions will form the focus for discussion between Sophie Lunn-RockliffeGiles Waller and Daniel Weiss from the Faculty of Divinity, considering the range of ways in which conversion has been narrated in early Christianity, rabbinic Judaism, and the Protestant Reformation.

Places are limited and registration is essential - book your free ticket here


THE END OF THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT? - 22 OCTOBER 2019, 7.30-9PM 
A talk about how thinkers from antiquity to today have examined the notion of 'the end of the world'.

 

From the flood in the Hebrew Bible to our current climate crisis, the end of the world has repeatedly been nigh.

Hjördis Becker-Lindenthal, Simone Kotva and Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe from the Faculty of Divinity will discuss how different thinkers from antiquity to today have conceptualised the notion of 'the end of the world' in theological terms - from the idea that planetary death is a punishment sent from God for human sins or a self-wrought disaster brought on by heedless consumption. Is the way the current climate debate is being framed anything new? How do we know that the order of change in the natural world is now critical?

Places are limited and registration is essential - book your free ticket here

 

 

PUBLIC EVENT: Scriptural Reasoning at Greenbelt 2019, 26 Aug 2019

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:09 AM
'Scripture & Violence - Challenging Assumptions': Scriptural Reasoning at Greenbelt Festival 2019 on 26 August at 11am
PUBLIC EVENT: Scriptural Reasoning at Greenbelt 2019, 26 Aug 2019

Scriptural Reasoning

If you are going to Greenbelt Festival this coming Bank Holiday weekend, join us for a 90 minute scriptural reasoning session to explore passages in the Jewish, Christian and Muslim sacred texts that seem to incite violence. 

Greenbelt 2019 is one of the world's largest Christian arts and activism festivals, and we are partnering with Rose Castle Foundation and Coexist House to run this event, with support from the University of Cambridge's Arts & Humanities Impact Fund.

More information is available here.

 

 

NEWS: Church Times coverage of CIP event

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:09 AM
'Neither inherently violent nor safe' by Michael Wakelin in Church Times, 19 July 2019

Having attended a public event organised by Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme at the London School of Economic’s Faith Centre, Michael Wakelin, former Head of Religion & Ethics at the BBC asked to what extent do scriptural texts inspire terrorist acts in an article in Church Times (dated 19 July 2019). 

As a follow-up to this event, Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme will also be co-hosting (with Rose Castle Foundation) a scriptural reasoning event on the same theme at Greenbelt Festival on 26 August 2019.

 

 

RESEARCH: Mosaic Law Among the Moderns Workshop, 22 July 2019

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:12 AM
CIP Conference Competition Winner Dr Paul Michael Kurtz organises event for international scholars - 'Mosaic Law Among the Moderns: Constructions of Biblical Law in 19th Century Germany'
RESEARCH: Mosaic Law Among the Moderns Workshop, 22 July 2019

'Marx the Modern Moses' by D. Bernstein c.1905

Through the figure of Moses, this event uncovered the place of biblical law in modern Germany. International and interdisciplinary scholars examined how ancient religious law impacted on discourse about modern legal structures during the consolidation of German states in the 19th century, tracing the transformations of Mosaic law in cultural, intellectual and religious history.

A keynote lecture by Prof Suzanne Marchand framed discussions which took place over three days (22-24 July 2019) in St John’s College between a group of 20 scholars, who looked at questions such as:

  • Did Moses plagiarize from Hammurabi?
  • Does biblical law have any place in a secular state?
  • Are modern Jews bound by ancient law?
  • How radical are the politics of Moses?

Speakers and discussants enjoyed thought-provoking papers and lively conversation, enriched by the group's diversity in career stage – covering professors, postdocs, and PhD students – and in discipline, which ranged from history and classics to religious, German, and Jewish studies. Attendees came from Germany and France, Italy and Israel, the UK and US, the Netherlands and Belgium.

Participants are now planning to publish their research, with some expansion into other fields to help round out the volume. 

Convened by Dr Paul Michael Kurtz, formerly Marie Curie Fellow at the Faculty of Divinity and Post Doctoral Research Associate at Queens' College, with funding from the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme Conference Competition and DAAD-Cambridge Research Hub, and the European Union's Horizon 2020 programme.

Dr Kurtz is now a Postdoctoral Fellow of the Research Foundation–Flanders, based at Ghent University.

Programme

Day One, 22 July

17.00 -18.00 Session 1: Introduction - Paul Kurtz (Cambridge) & Keynote

Suzanne Marchand (Baton Rouge), 'Greek Freedom and Mosaic Law in 19th-Century Germany'

Day Two, 23 July

9.30–11.00 Session 2: Bible

Ofri Ilany (Jerusalem), 'The Israelites' Nationalgeist: Ethnography and Politics in Johann David Michaelis's Interpretation of Mosaic Law'
Felix Weidemann (Berlin), 'Moses or Hammurabi? The question to the origin of law in German ancient Near Eastern studies at the turn of the 20th century'
Chair: Dan Pioske (Savannah)

11.30–13.00 Session 3: Judaism

Irene Zwiep (Amsterdam), 'Post-constitutionalism? Conceptualizations of law in the nineteenth-century Wissenschaft des Judentums'
Judith Frishman (Leiden), TBC
Chair: TBC


14.30–16.00 Session 4: Comparisons

Cristiana Facchini (Bologna), 'Monitoring German Scholarship on the Bible: Jesuit & Catholic counter-narratives (1850s-1900s)'
Annelies Lannoy (Ghent), 'The Law and the Republic. Maurice Vernes and Aristide Astruc on the history of Mosaic Law and its instruction in the ecole laique'
Chair: TBC

Day Three, 24 July

11.00–12.30 Session 5: Politics

Nico Camilleri (Padua), 'Which law for the colonial empire? Rule of law and (Christian) religion in German colonialism'
Carolin Kosuch (Göttingen), 'Moses and the Left: Traces of the Torah in Modern Jewish Political Thought'
Chair: Emiliano Urciuoli (Erfurt)

12.30–13.00 Session 6: Concluding Remarks

Paul Kurtz (Cambridge)

 

RESEARCH: Scripture & The Enemy SRU Conference 2019

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:15 AM
Scripture & The Enemy: Scriptural Reasoning in the University Conference 2019, 1-3 July 2019, Faculty of Divinity
RESEARCH: Scripture & The Enemy SRU Conference 2019

Artist Unknown 'Christian & Muslim Playing Chess'

This three-day international conference will explore how emnity and/or enemies are treated in the textual traditions of Judaism, Islam and Christianity.

Academics and researchers will present papers that examine the ways in which engaging with pre-modern texts and traditions can illuminate and challenge contemporary assumptions about emnity/enemies.

Guiding questions include:

  • Do these texts and traditions call for wholesale elimination of enmity, or is an ongoing functional role attributed to it?
  • Do these texts and traditions depict or call for cultivation of ‘good enemies’ without demonisation, polarisation or essentialising?
  • Are the most salient enemies always recognisably ‘other’ (that is, affiliated with a ‘different’ cultural group or religious tradition)?
  • What do these texts and traditions say about ‘enemies’ that are not persons? 

The programme (subject to change):

Monday, 1 July 2019

2.00–3.00: Arrival, Tea/Coffee

3.00–3.30: Welcome and Introductions

(Julia Snyder and Daniel Weiss)

3.30–4.30: Text Study 1 (small groups)

4.30–5.30: Discussion Session 1

Daniel Weiss (UK), Thou shalt have no enemies before me: Hatred, Vengeance, Third Party Evaluation, and the Suspension of Judgment in the Hebrew Bible

Hannah Hashkes (Israel), A Friendly Look at the Notion of EIVA (Animosity) in Rabbinic Law

Tuesday, 2 July 2019

9.00–10.30: Text Study 2 (small groups)

10.30–11.00: Tea/Coffee

11.00–12.30: Discussion Session 2

Faiza Masood (UK), The Role of Satan in Human Relations: A Quranic Examination

Kumar Aniket (UK), Role of External and Internal Enmity in Group Formation

Laurie Zoloth (USA), Bad Guy: Sin and Doubt in Climactic Change

12.30–2.00: Lunch (provided)

2.00–3.30: Text Study 3 (small groups)

3.30–4.00: Tea/Coffee

4.00–5.30: Discussion Session 3

David Barr (Canada), Figuring the Enemy: Christian Interpretations of the Muslim Threat in the Sixteenth Century

Nauman Faizi (Pakistan), Friendship at any cost? Sir Syed contra Mehdi Ali

Julia Snyder (Germany), Scripture and Violence

Wednesday, 3 July 2019

9.00–10.30: Text Study 4 (small groups)

10.30–11.00: Tea/Coffee

11.00–12.30: Discussion Session 4

Jim Fodor (USA), ‘Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you’: What Kind of Moral Psychology?

Jason Fout (USA), Being Loved as an Enemy

Miriam Feldmann Kaye (Israel), ‘Scriptural Reasoning’ in Jerusalem: Theological Discord and Discourses of Diagnosis in Hospitals

12.30–2.00: Lunch (provided)

2.00–3.30: Discussion Session 5

Mark James (USA), Blessed are the Scriptural Peacemakers: Origen, Wisdom, and the Harmonization of Scripture

Peter Kang (USA), Memory, Enmity and Clement of Alexandria’s ‘Unmindfulness of Injury’ 

Hanoch Ben-Pazi (Israel), ‘From Foe to Friend’ (S.Y. Agnon): Models of Brotherliness in the Hebrew Bible. Love and Hatred, Foe and Friend

 

PUBLIC EVENT: Scripture & Violence: Common Assumptions, Impact & Response - 27 June

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:21 AM
Scripture and Violence: Common Assumptions, Impact and Response - Scriptural Reasoning & Panel Discussion at LSE Faith Centre on 27 June 2019, 7.30 -9.15pm
PUBLIC EVENT: Scripture & Violence: Common Assumptions, Impact & Response - 27 June

Sacred Desert window by Christopher Le Brun at LSE Faith Centre

Scriptural Reasoning & Panel Discussion

 

This event, organised by the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme at the University of Cambridge's Faculty of Divinity, in partnership with Coexist House, will use scriptural reasoning to examine:

  • The role scriptures play in motivating or justifying violence. 
  • How do the texts of the Hebrew Bible and New Testament relate to violence committed by Jews and Christians?
  • Is there anything in the Qur'an that makes Muslims likely to perform acts of violence?
  • How should one respond when someone expresses concerns about these texts?

It will include presentations of research from the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme's project on 'Scripture and Violence' and participatory discussion of scriptural texts (scriptural reasoning).

Panelists will include Dr Julia Snyder (Regensburg), Dr Nauman Faizi (Lahore),  Dr Daniel Weiss (Cambridge), and Prof David Ford (Cambridge).

Discussion will draw on a recent case where an asylum seeker asserted that he had converted to Christianity after discovering that it was a 'peaceful' religion, and was rejected for asylum by the Home Office on the grounds that the Bible contains violence. This case illustrates the practical impact that common assumptions about scripture and violence have in contemporary society. More information about this case can be found on the following links:

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/home-office-christian-convert-asylum-refused-bible-not-peaceful-a8832026.html 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/21/world/europe/britain-asylum-seeker-christianity.html) 

Places are limited, so please book now to avoid disappointment via

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/scripture-and-violence-common-assumptions-impact-and-response-tickets-62973022004

Sandwiches and light refreshments will be provided.

 

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Prof John Barclay

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:20 AM
Prof John Barclay (University of Durham) 'The Support of the Poor in early Judaism and early Christianity: A Comparison' Friday, 31 May 2019, Lightfoot Room, 2-4pm
RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Prof John Barclay

Seminar poster

Professor John Barclay (University of Durham and CIP Visiting Fellow) will give a talk on 'The Support of the Poor in early Judaism and early Christianity: A Comparison'. Professor William Horbury will be the respondent.

Early Christianity inherited much from its Jewish matrix in concern for the poor, in ethos and theological rationale - but their social networks were different, and differently constituted. Prof Barclay's talk will enquire if this caused differences in the organisation, reach and rationale for their respective support systems for and among the poor. One emergent theme will be the significance of 'weak links'; another, the Christological reconfiguration of Jewish theology. 

Students and colleagues from all disciplines are warmly invited to attend - if you need further information, do contact Dr Giles Waller.  Lunch will be served beforehand.

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Prof Robert B Gibbs

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:21 AM
Research Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations, Professor Robert B. Gibbs (University of Toronto), 'Commentary at the crossroads of the disciplines' Thursday 23 May 2019, Lightfoot Room, 12:00-13:30
RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Prof Robert B Gibbs

Glossa Ordinaria - image courtesy University of Toronto

Professor Robert B. Gibbs (University of Toronto & CIP Visiting Fellow) will give a talk on 'Commentary at the crossroads of the disciplines'. The respondent is Prof John Barclay (University of Durham & CIP Visiting Fellow).  

Students and colleagues are welcome to attend - if you need further information, do contact Dr Giles Waller.  Lunch will follow the seminar.

 

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Professor Paul Shore

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:44 AM
Research Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations, Professor Paul Shore (University of Regina and Visiting Fellow, Cambridge Inter-faith Programme), ‘The Jesuit Translation of the Qur'an in the Seventeenth Century’, Thursday 4 Oct 2018 12:00-13:30

A seminar presented by Professor Paul Shore, University of Regina and Visiting Fellow, Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme. The paper is titled 'The Spirit of the letter: The Politics of a 1622 Qur'an Translation in the Christian West', and a response will be given by Dr Justin Meggit. It will take place on Thursday 4 October, 12:00 – 13:30  in the Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity. 

The session will be followed by informal refreshments in the Selwyn Room (Divinity).

All welcome. Please email team@interfaith.cam.ac.uk if you would like to attend.

Overview

My paper will have four parts.  First, I'll say a little bit on the early history of Latin translations of the Qur'an in the Christian West.  Then I'll explain the background pf the translation that will be the focus of my work at Cambridge: that of Ignazio Lomellini, a Genoan Jesuit who died in 1645.  I'll talk next about the tension between the desire to produce an accurate translation of the Arabic and the requirement Lomellini faced, given when and where he worked, to prove that Islam and its sacred text are "false," heretical," etc. To conclude I'll say a few words about the two Suras from the Qur'an I have chosen to concentrate on Srua 18 and 53, and what I hope to accomplish during my Fellowship in Cambridge

 

PUBLIC EVENT: Borders of Violence and Visions of Peace

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:37 AM
Presented by Coexist House and the Cambridge Inter-faith Programme, the second of thee panels on themes of South Asian Interfaith Relations at St Ethelburga's Centre for Reconciliation and Peace

“Borders of Violence and Visions of Peace: The Religious Landscapes of South Asia”

St Ethelburga's Centre of Reconciliation and Peace, London

Thursday 7 June, 6.30pm

Join us for the second in a series of conversations exploring interfaith understandings and relations inspired by South Asia, hosted by Coexist House and the Cambridge Inter-faith Proframme. In this panel talk, speakers will reflect on the complex tapestries of religious belief and practice across various South Asian landscapes which have generated distinctive of peace and conflagrations of interreligious violence. This will be followed by a Q&A.

Chair: Timothy Winter (University of Cambridge)

Speakers:

Humeira Iqtidar (King's College London)
Reid Locklin (University of Toronto)
Kusum Gopal (UN Technical Expert)

If you have any questions or want to know any more about the event, please contact us at team@interfaith.cam.ac.uk

Entry is free and light refreshments will be served.

Please register for the event here:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/borders-of-violence-and-visions-of-peace-the-religious-landscapes-of-south-asia-tickets-46364657940

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Dr Susannah Ticciati and Dr Daniel H. Weiss

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:38 AM
Research Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations, Dr Susannah Ticciati (King’s College London) and Daniel H. Weiss (University of Cambridge) ‘Negotiating Conflicting Religious Truth Claims: Rabbinic and Christian Accounts in Dialogue’, Thursday 24 May 14:00-16:00, Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity

Dr Susannah Ticciati (Reader in Christian Theology, King’s College London)

Dr Daniel H. Weiss (Polonsky-Coexist Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies, Faculty of Divinity)

Negotiating Conflicting Religious Truth Claims : Rabbinic and Christian Accounts in Dialogue

Thursday 24 May 14:00-16:00

Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity

All welcome. Please email team@interfaith.cam.ac.uk if you would like to attend so that we can track attendance

Abstract

This session will use philosophical and textual approaches to explore the question of asserting religious claims, whether to others or to oneself, in the context of the traditions of Christianity and of rabbinic Judaism.  Is there a basis for making 'universal' claims that apply not only to one's own community but also to those currently outside that community? Are there distinctive dynamics within both Christian and rabbinic traditions that expect core religious claims to be viewed as implausible by outsiders?  The session will be structured as a dialogue between the two presenters, and will engage the potential epistemological implications of texts such as the discussion of 'foolishness' and 'stumbling block' in 1 Corinthians 1:18-25, the suffering servant passages from Isaiah, and classical rabbinic presentations of conversion and the 'invisible' status of Israel's election.

 

Susannah Ticciati

Susannah Ticciati is Reader in Christian Theology at King’s College London. She read maths and theology for her BA at Peterhouse, Cambridge, where she went on to do her PhD in theology, after which she held a research fellowship at Selwyn College, Cambridge. Her research is in constructive Christian doctrinal theology, with foci in apophatic theology and scriptural hermeneutics. She is the author of Job and the Disruption of Identity: Reading Beyond Barth, and of A New Apophaticism: Augustine and the Redemption of Signs.

 

Daniel Weiss

Daniel H. Weiss is Polonsky-Coexist Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies in the Faculty of Divinity at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Paradox and the Prophets: Hermann Cohen and the Indirect Communication (OUP, 2012) and co-editor of Purity and Danger Now: New Perspectives (Routledge, 2016).   He is actively involved in the Cambridge Interfaith Programme and in Scriptural Reasoning.

PUBLIC EVENT: The Promise of Intimacy - Searching for the Divine in Modern Times

last modified Oct 30, 2019 11:12 AM
Presented by Coexist House and the Cambridge Inter-faith Programme, the first of thee panels on themes of South Asian Interfaith Relations at St Ethelburga's Centre for Reconciliation and Peace: 'The Promise of Intimacy: Searching for the Divine in Modern Times'

“The Promise of Intimacy: Searching for the Divine in Modern Times”

St Ethelburga's Centre of Reconciliation and Peace, London

6pm Thursday 31 May

Chair: Fatimah Ashrif (Coexist House)

Speakers: 

Farhana Mayer (University of Oxford)
Luigi Gioia (V
on Hügel Institute)
Christopher V. Jones (University of Oxford)

Many faith traditions have, in their different ways, offered pathways for those desiring a deeper intimacy with the Divine. We often hear of words such as 'spiritual', 'heart', and 'soul' , as a way of describing these dimensions.

A central theme shared across various Hindu, Islamic spiritual, and Roman Catholic mystical traditions is that the divine reality is not simply another entity far out there, dwelling perhaps on the top of the Himalayas or on the peripheries of the Milky Way, but is situated in the deepest interiorities of the human heart. Therefore, the ‘union’ with the divine involves processes of the cultivation of interiority through which the religious practitioner understands that the divine beloved is simultaneously extremely distant and intimately present.

In South Asia, such teachings lead some to believe in an underlying unity behind different faiths. We see this sometimes expressed at the level of popular spiritual piety. For example, the way in which the shrines of particular holy figures - such as Ajmer Sharif in India - become a meeting point of the faithful from many different traditions. Meanwhile, many have noted the popularity of 13th century Muslim mystic Rumi in the modern western world, amongst those of different faiths (and none), such as through incorporating his poetry and practices into their daily worship/spiritual practice.

Such practices are not often fully understood and might be perceived at best as syncretic or at worst unorthodox or even heretical by some more traditional voices.

The panel will seek to explore spiritual understandings as these might be expressed by different faiths and how these might be/ are practised. With a view to offering the audience a personal encounter with the very real and lived beliefs and practices of others, panelists will be asked to speak about the celebration of “Divine intimacy” within their traditions, their personal search, where it has taken them and what they have learned about themselves and the nature of Divinity, the spiritual tools they have used in seeking the divine and how this impacts their personal engagement with the world.

PUBLIC EVENT: Coexist House and Cambridge Inter-faith Programme South Asia Colloquium Series

last modified Oct 30, 2019 11:08 AM
Coexist House and the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme presents a series of seminars exploring interfaith understandings and relations within South Asian communities at St Ethelburga's Centre for Reconciliation and Peace

The three panel discussions will be as follows: 

The first of these will take place on Thursday 31 May, starting at 6.30pm at St Ethelburga's Centre for Reconcilation and Peace in London. More details to follow, please contact us at team@interfaith.cam.ac.uk

https://www.interfaith.cam.ac.uk/

http://www.coexisthouse.org.uk/ 

https://stethelburgas.org/

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Dr Sami Everett

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:45 AM
Event: Research Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations, Dr Sami Everett (CRASSH, University of Cambridge), ‘From Textiles to Telecoms: Retro Reinterpretations of North Africa in Postcolonial Parisian Jewish-Muslim Interaction’, Thursday 10 May 2018 12:00-14:00

Given by Dr Sami Everett (Research Associate, CRASSH, University of Cambridge):

From Textiles to Telecoms: Retro Reinterpretations of North Africa in Postcolonial Parisian Jewish-Muslim Interaction

A response to the paper will be given by Dr Ben Gidley (Birkbeck, University of London).

All welcome. There will be an informal lunch after the event: please email team@interfaith.cam.ac.uk if you would like to attend so that we have an idea of the numbers attending

Abstract

This talk investigates the enigma of Jewish North African sensibility and its intergenerational changes and continuities in Paris since 1981 through the notion of retro. After giving an historical overview of the Maghrebi presence in France and building the theoretical scaffolding on which retro sits in relation to ways of identifying with the Maghreb this talk proceeds by way of an ethnography of commercial exchange in the domain of textiles and globalised telecommunications as privileged locations for witnessing working and social relations with and across religious difference between Maghrebi Jews and Muslims and their descendants. I argue that an obfuscated Maghrebi centre exists to these relations across complex, little-known sites that lie at the meeting point of common cultural memories, mutual economic dependency, changing gender and class relations, and geopolitical conflict. More specifically, relationships between Jews and Muslims in the textiles and dress shops of la Goutte d’Or that we will discover are often defined by the desire to recover a variously expressed 'lost world' of the Maghreb. Retro, as a hermeneutic device to read Maghrebi Jewish imaginaries in Paris across generations, allows us to look at how contemporary re-conceptualisations of the past are utilised to negotiate an ethnically plural and potentially — through clearly not always — convivial present.

 Other Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme seminars this term:

Dr Susannah Ticciati (King's College London), 'Negotiating Conflicting Religious Truth Claim: Rabbinic and Christian Accounts in Dialogue'

Thursday 24 May, Seminar Room 7, Faculty of Divinity, 14:00-16:00

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Dr Reid B. Locklin

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:42 AM
The Senior Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations presents Dr Reid B. Locklin (St Michael’s College, University of Toronto), ‘Conquering the Quarters, Preaching in Silence: an Interreligious Exploration of Missionary Advaita Vedānta’, Thursday 3 May 2018 11am-1pm

The Faculty of Divinity Introduces the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme's second term-length Senior Seminar Series in Inter-Religious Relations. The second session of Easter Term will be given by Dr Reid B. Locklin, Associate Professor of Christianity and the Intellectual Tradition, St Michael’s College, University of Toronto. The paper is titled 'Conquering the Quarters, Preaching in Silence: an Interreligious Exploration of Missionary Advaita Vedānta', and a response will be given Dr Ankur Barua, Academic Director of CIP and Lecture in Hindu Studies at the Faculty of Divionity.. It will take place on Thursday 3 May, 11.00 am – 1.00 p.m. in Seminar Room 7, Faculty of Divinity. 

All welcome. There will be an informal lunch after the event: please email team@interfaith.cam.ac.uk if you would like to attend so that we have an idea of the numbers attending

Abstract

For some four centuries, Hindus and Christians engaged a public dispute about the real or imagined threat posed by aggressive Christian missionaries, intent on converting Hindus to a foreign tradition. In my presentation, I propose to reframe this controversy by shifting attention from the South Asian context and the history of this particular debate to a comparative study of “mission” itself, as a category of thought and practice. The presentation will focus particularly on the theologies of several Hindu missionaries in the modern era, who gave new expression to the non-dualist tradition of Advaita Vedānta and reinvented it as a global religious movement. Through an interreligious study of such movements, I suggest, mission and conversion are opened to re-signification, with consequences for both Hinduism and Christianity.

Other CIP seminars this term:

Dr Sami Everett (CRASSH, University of Cambridge), 'Maghrebinicité: North African Jewish experience in peri-urban Paris since 1981' Thursday 10 May, Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity, 12:00-14:00

Dr Susannah Ticciati (King's College London), 'Negotiating Conflicting Religious Truth Claim: Rabbinic and Christian Accounts in Dialogue' Thursday 24 May, Seminar Room 7, Faculty of Divinity, 14:00-16:00

RESEARCH: CIP Seminar - Professor Marianne Moyaert

last modified Oct 30, 2019 10:35 AM
The Senior Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations presents Professor Marianne Moyaert, Chair of Comparative Theology and Hermeneutics of Interreligious Dialogue, VU University of Amsterdam: 'Ricoeur's Interreligious Hermeneutics, Prejudice, and the Problem of Testimonial Injustice'

Professor Marianne Moyaert, Chair of Comparative Theology and Hermeneutics of Interreligious Dialogue at VU University of Amsterdam will present a paper is titled 'Ricoeur's Interreligious Hermeneutics, Prejudice, and the Problem of Testimonial Injustice', and a response will be given by PhD student Barnabas Aspray. It will take place on Thursday 26 April, 2.00 pm – 4.00 p.m. in the Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity. 

The session will be followed by informal refreshments in the Selwyn Room (Divinity).

All welcome. Please email team@interfaith.cam.ac.uk if you would like to attend.

Abstract and Background

I work as an interreligious educator, at a multireligious department of Theology and Religion at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, where both Christian, Muslim, Buddhist and Hindu ‘theologians’ are trained as well as religious scholars. My prime pedagogical responsibility in this department is to help form our students in such a way that they become interreligiously literate. Considering the fact that much contemporary societal conflicts are not only due to a lack of religious knowledge about different traditions but are also related to deep prejudices and misunderstandings this is an important pedagogical challenge.

The French philosopher Paul Ricoeur, who is sometimes called the philosopher of all dialogues, has especially shown himself to be a rewarding conversation partner in this process of developing an interreligious pedagogy. His hermeneutical anthropology, according to which we are all others has enabled me to dedramatise the challenge of interreligious learning. We all enter the hermeneutical circle as prejudiced beings and to understand is always to interpret. Though Ricoeur would dismiss any claim to full or complete comprehension just like he would meet all claims to neutrality with suspicion, there is no need to become fatalistic. Human beings (and here Ricoeur shows himself to be a heir of reflexive philosophy) are also capable of critical self-reflection and transformation.

For a long time I have aligned his hermeneutical philosophy and my interreligious education. This has resulted in a pedagogical approach which enables students to develop their skills of interpretation and provides ample opportunities for critical (self-)reflection. However, based on several years of teaching experience in a multireligious context, I have become increasingly conscious of some of the limits of Ricoeur’s interreligious hermeneutics: his hermeneutics lacks a power analysis, which reckons with the majority-minority dynamics in the classroom, as a consequence of which some are more different than others just like some are more prejudiced than others. It has been my educational experience that what some students bring to the conversation is simply not taken seriously, not because they do not have anything significant to say nor because of an innocent misunderstanding, but rather because what they say does not fit in the dominant (often implicit) hermeneutical framework of the majority. The end result is what epistemologist Miranda Fricker would call testimonial injustice, which “happens whenever prejudice on the part of a hearer causes them to attribute a deflated level of credibility to a speaker’s word.” (Fricker 2007)  

In my presentation, I wish to do three things. First, I will briefly provide a Ricoeurian approach to interreligious learning as an encounter between self and other. Secondly, and based on a particular case that I have drawn from my teaching experience, I will explain how Ricoeur’s hermeneutics lacks a power analysis, which likewise limits his capacity to grabble with the problem of testimonial injustice and I will explain how this negatively affects the learning opportunities of students in a multireligious classroom. Last but not least, I will formulate the beginnings of a critical interfaith pedagogy in an effort to overcome the problem of testimonial injustice.

I have particularly benefitted from Ricoeur’s suggestion to think of interreligious dialogue as a practice of linguistic hospitality.

 

Other seminars this term:

Dr Reid B. Locklin (University of Toronto), 'Conquering the Quarters, Preaching in Silence: an Interreligious Exploration of Missionary Advaita Vedānta'

Thursday 3 May, Seminar Room 7, Faculty of Divinity, 11:00-13:00

Dr Sami Everett (CRASSH, University of Cambridge), 'Maghrebinicité: North African Jewish experience in peri-urban Paris since 1981'

Thursday 10 May, Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity, 12:00-14:00

Dr Susannah Ticciati (King's College London), 'Negotiating Conflicting Religious Truth Claim: Rabbinic and Christian Accounts in Dialogue'

Thursday 24 May, Seminar Room 7, Faculty of Divinity, 14:00-16:00

 

NEWS: Job opportunities - Sultan Qaboos Professorship & CIP Research Associate

last modified Oct 30, 2019 11:00 AM
Inviting applications for a Professorship/CIP's Academic Director and for a Research Associate in Inter-Faith Relations (Fixed Term)

Sultan Qaboos Professorship

The Board of Electors to the Sultan Qaboos Professorship of Abrahamic Faiths and Shared Values invite applications for this Professorship from persons whose work falls within the general field of the Professorship to take up appointment on 1 October 2020 or as soon as possible thereafter.

Candidates will have an outstanding research record of international stature in the study of the relationships between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and their relationship to other traditions and to the modern world, and have the vision, leadership, experience and enthusiasm to build on current strengths in maintaining and developing a leading research presence. They will hold a PhD or equivalent postgraduate qualification.

Standard professorial duties include teaching and research, examining, supervision and administration. The Professor will be based in Cambridge.

Closing date: 2 December 2019

More information/advertisement here.

Further particulars here.

Research Associate in Inter-Faith Relations (Fixed Term)

The Faculty of Divinity invites applications for a new fixed-term appointment as Research Associate (Grade 7) in the field of Modern Inter-Faith Relations for nine months from 1 January 2020 or as soon as possible thereafter (Grade 7, £32,816-£40,322).

The successful candidate will be expected to undertake his/her own research in an area relevant to the interests of CIP, and can expect some appropriate mentoring. The appointee will be expected to contribute to the research and public engagement profile of CIP and to do some administration. Candidates should already possess a doctoral degree in a relevant discipline. The person appointed will be based in the Faculty of Divinity in Cambridge.

Closing date: 25 November 2019

More information/advertisement here.

 

 

RESEARCH: Leverhulme Visiting Professor Lecture & Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations - Dr Asad Q. Ahmed

last modified Oct 30, 2019 11:02 AM
The Senior Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations and Leverhulme Visiting Professor Lectures from Professor Asad Q. Ahmed: 'Scripture and Logic' and 'Prophethood, Sectarian Politics, and Rationalist Disciplines in Nineteenth Century India', will take place on Thursday 1 March and Friday 2 March 2018, 12.00 pm – 1.30 p.m. in the Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity.

This term the Faculty of Divinity is introducing a new Senior Seminar series in Inter-Religious Relations. Our second session will be spread across two seminars and will be given by the Leverhulme Visiting Professor Asad Q. Ahmed. The two sessions, 'Scripture and Logic', and 'Prophethood, Sectarian Politics, and Rationalist Disciplines in Nineteenth Century India' will take place on Thursday 1 March and Friday 2 March, 12.00 pm – 1.30 p.m. in the Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity. 

Both sessions will be followed by an informal lunch in the Selwyn Room (Divinity).

All welcome. Please email team@interfaith.cam.ac.uk if you would like to attend the lunch, so we can have an idea of numbers. 

 

Abstracts

'Scripture and Logic'

In the history of Muslim exegesis, Qurʾān, Chapter 8, Verse 23, posed a vexing challenge.  On the one hand, the contextually-grounded interpretation of the passage meant the abandonment of several foundational claims and canonical elements of the Sunnī theological system.  And on the other hand, the preservation of this system required reading practices that generally lacked historical recognition.  In other words, a significant tension existed between the elaborated system that constituted the grounds of Sunnī theological discourse and the traditionally-preferred hermeneutics on the integral Qurʾānic lemma.  This lecture presents some historical approaches to this verse, with the focus resting on a treatise by the Ottoman scholar Ismāʿīl Gelenbevī (1143-1205/1730-91).  It concludes with some broader reflections on how the latter scholar imagined the relation of logic to scripture.

'Prophethood, Sectarian Politics, and Rationalist Disciplines in Nineteenth Century India'

This paper presents a partial theory of commentarial practices and of the genre of commentary/gloss in postclassical philosophical writings in the Muslim world.  The thesis is based on the study of a seventeenth-century logic text produced in Muslim India and a range of commentaries it inspired.  The case study focuses on the subject term of propositions.

Asad Q. Ahmed is associate professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.  He is the author of The Religious Elite of the Early Islamic HijazAvicenna's Deliverance, and of the forthcoming Palimpsests of Themselves:  Philosophical Commentaries in Postclassical Islam.  He has written several articles and co-edited collected volumes in the areas of Islamic history, philosophy in the Islamic world, and on Muslim legal theories.

Sessions will be chaired and responded to by Dr Tony Street, Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge.

 

Senior Seminar: An Overview

Since its 2002 founding, the Cambridge Inter-faith Programme has pursued questions of ‘interactive particularity’ among religious traditions, in terms of both academic research and public engagement.  This intellectual approach seeks to avoid the assumption of universal or ahistorical essences or impulses present in all cultures and individuals, sometimes marked as ‘comparativist’ approaches. Instead, it draws attention to the formation of the identity-bearing particularities of religious traditions, exploring the internal character, the forms of intentionality and the practices associated with these identities. In this respect, we seek to keep in play both theological and religious studies approaches, in the expectation that this mode of enquiry will yield a deeper understanding of the complexities associated with inter-faith relations, and how and where we might begin to analyse them.

In establishing the Seminar, we encourage a broad and inter-disciplinary interpretation of ‘interactive particularity’. The heuristic value of each of these explorations lies in how studying the profound engagements between religious ideas, embodied lives and texts develops a more nuanced understanding of the traditions themselves. Topics include Jewish, Christian, and Muslim engagement with Platonism, the role of religious texts and traditions of interpretation, the use of particular spaces by separate religious traditions, and contemporary engagements with science, ethics, the law, and forms of secularism. We are also interested in analyses of ‘inter-faith’ and related ideas as objects of study, such as evaluations of conceptual and methodological approaches associated with this field.    

New Senior Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations

last modified Oct 14, 2019 10:36 AM
The very first Senior Seminar in Inter-Religious Relations is "Divine Law and Human Intervention: Judaism, Christianity, Islam and the US Constitutional Debate". It will take place on Thursday, 1 February, 11.00 am – 1.00 p.m. in the Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity.

This term the Faculty of Divinity is introducing a new Senior Seminar series in Inter-Religious Relations. Our first session will be on 'Divine Law and Human Intervention: Judaism, Christianity, Islam and the US Constitutional Debate', and will take place on Thursday, 1 February, 11.00 am – 1.00 p.m. in the Lightfoot Room, Faculty of Divinity. 

Speaking: 

- Dr Holger Zellentin, Lecturer in Classical Rabbinic Judaism, Faculty of Divinity, Cambridge

Responding:

- Dr Daniel Weiss, Polonsky Coexist Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies, University of Cambridge
- Dr Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe, Lecturer in Patristics, University of Cambridge

This paper will contextualize the current debates in US constitutional law within the broad context of the Jewish, Christian and Islamic legal culture. Exploring the tension between human innovation and an ancient code seen as authoritative suggests striking similarities between these traditions and sheds new light on religious and political particularities of past and present.

After our opening seminar on 1 February, we will host Professor Asad Ahmed (University of California, Berkeley, and Visiting Fellow, University of Cambridge) on 1 March.

Senior Seminar: An Overview

Since its founding, the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme has pursued questions of ‘interactive particularity’ among religious traditions, in terms of both academic research and public engagement.  This intellectual approach seeks to avoid the assumption of universal or ahistorical essences or impulses present in all cultures and individuals, sometimes marked as ‘comparativist’ approaches. Instead, it draws attention to the formation of the identity-bearing particularities of religious traditions, exploring the internal character, the forms of intentionality and the practices associated with these identities. In this respect, we seek to keep in play both theological and religious studies approaches, in the expectation that this mode of enquiry will yield a deeper understanding of the complexities associated with inter-faith relations, and how and where we might begin to analyse them.

In establishing the Seminar, we encourage a broad and inter-disciplinary interpretation of ‘interactive particularity’. The heuristic value of each of these explorations lies in how studying the profound engagements between religious ideas, embodied lives and texts develops a more nuanced understanding of the traditions themselves. Topics include Jewish, Christian, and Muslim engagement with Platonism, the role of religious texts and traditions of interpretation, the use of particular spaces by separate religious traditions, and contemporary engagements with science, ethics, the law, and forms of secularism. We are also interested in analyses of ‘inter-faith’ and related ideas as objects of study, such as evaluations of conceptual and methodological approaches associated with this field.    

 

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NEWS: Divinity Dispatches - Launch of Faculty of Divinity Lockdown Website

May 04, 2020

A new website has been launched to enable the Faculty of Divinity & CIP to keep in touch with colleagues, friends and students during lockdown

NEWS: CIP welcomes Professor Esra Özyürek

Apr 17, 2020

Prof Esra Özyürek has been announced as the new Sultan Qaboos Professor of Abrahamic Faiths & Shared Values & CIP Academic Director

NEWS: Call for papers on 'Responsibility & Scripture' for ASA Conference 2020

Feb 12, 2020

Invitation to submit a paper abstract for our panel ‘Responsibility and Scripture’ at the forthcoming Conference of the Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and the Commonwealth (ASA), taking place at the University of St Andrews from 24-27 August 2020.